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Hypoxis hemerocallidea

This beautiful tuberous perennial grows extremely well in the Indigenous Garden. Easily recognisable with its strap-like leaves which are arranged tidily one above the other in 3 ranks. These hairy leaves are arched with prominent ribs, narrowing at the tips. This plant provides much colour with half a dozen inflorescences per plant with each one carrying between 5 to 12 bright yellow star flowers. These however are short lived, closing at midday.

Conservation Status:
H. hemerocallidea is not listed as a threatened plant in the SANBI Red List. However the natural grasslands in the urban metropolitan areas are under extreme pressure because of urban sprawl. Many plants, including related species, are also dug up due to their popularity as a medicinal remedy. Since the plants do not re-seed easily, the demand for the tubers may cause the plants in the wild to decline.

Caution:
The plant and its derivatives are sold in many muti markets, and commercial products are widely available. However Hypoxis also contains toxic substances in the raw form, and has not been registered with the Medical Control Council for that reason. Warning: The raw products can be toxic and must be used with caution. It is recommended to use a shelf product as a safe alternative.

Family Name:
HYPOXIDACEAE
Common Name:
Star flower, yellow star (Eng.); sterblom, geelsterretjie, gifbol (Afr.)
Plant Height:
30 cm
Flower Colour:
Yellow
Flowering Time:
October, November, December, January, February, March, April